Carbon dating methods archaeology

16 Jan

Oakley (1979) suggested its development meant an almost complete re-writing of the evolution and cultural emergence of the human species.

Desmond Clark (1979) wrote that were it not for radiocarbon dating, "we would still be foundering in a sea of imprecisions sometime bred of inspired guesswork but more often of imaginative speculation" (Clark, 1979:7).

Libby of the University of Chicago in immediate post-WW2 years.

The technique provides a common chronometric time scale of worldwide applicability on a routine basis in the age range from about 300 calender years to between 40,000 and 50,000 years.This term means that older artefacts are usually found below younger items.Radiocarbon dating is one of the best known archaeological dating techniques available to scientists, and the many people in the general public have at least heard of it.A man called Willard F Libby pioneered it at the University of Chicago in the 50's. This is now the most widely used method of age estimation in the field of archaeology.When museums and collectors purchase archaeological items for their collections they enter an expensive and potentially deceptive commercial fine arts arena.